Creativity, Innovation, Aesthetics and Originality

Did You Know The Ciao Criteria; I.e. The Most Important Aspect How a Design Is Considered and Evaluated in a Design Award or Competition

How to judge entries in a competition: suggestions for evaluation criteria. To understand the most common evaluation criteria in ranking designs in a design competition, a survey was made with 1000+ participating design competitions. The data revealed the most common criteria questions and bullet points for design competitions.The importance and ranking of evaluation criteria for design was discovered based on the number of times they are written in the briefs of design competitions. After an analysis of the statistics available at designcompetition.com, and through also clustering the similar criteria and merging them into bigger clusters, the following were identified as the major evaluation criteria of design competitions:Originality, Creativity, Design, Innovation, Presentation, Aesthetics, Materials, Engineering, Ergonomics, Feasibility, Durability, Design Quality, Degree of Innovation, Safety, Project Innovation, Honesty, Humanity, Self-Explanatory Qualities, Technology, Market Value, Contextual Impacts, Commercial Impacts, Interpretation of the Brief, Clear Communication, Economic Significance, Economic Potential, Social Benefits, Concept Quality, Aesthetic Appeal, Aesthetic Quality, Artistic Skill, Authenticity, Visual Identity, Brand Value, Unique Characteristics, Appropriateness, Allowing Industrialization, Original Work, Conforming to Laws, Marketing Value, Cleverness, Daring, Coherency, Commercial Aspects, Communication Skills, Compelling, Connectivity, Consistency with Brief, Consumer Experience, Structure, Construction, Architecture, Context, Content, Craftsmanship, Creative Achievement, Creative use of Material, Attractiveness, Critical Thinking, Conceptualization, Design Performance, Design Esthetics, Design Solution, Effectiveness, Emotional Content, Elaboration of Design, Entertainment Value, Fun Factors, Ease of Creation, Ease of Production, Clear Presentation, Idea, Health, Ergonomic Factors, Technological Innovation, Inclusive Design, Informational Value, Design Capacity, Impression Value, Sustainability, Inspiring, Quality of Craft, Quality of Work, Realism, Recyclable, Regulations, Ethic Codes, Security, Simplicity, Sense of Humor, Responding to Needs, Social Relevance, Storytelling, Sticking to the Brief, Communicative Aspects, Problem Solution, Uniqueness, Comprehensibility, Function, Usefulness, Utility, Visual Design, Visualization of Use, and Workmanship.Considering the list of the design competitions evaluation criteria as derived through the analysis of all the competition briefs, we understand that designs are judged on two different main aspects: 1. Design Charisma and 2. Design Constitution, and furthermore, they are filtered for their 3. Design Wisdom. Design Charisma includes criteria such as the Design Quality, Aesthetics, Visual Presentation, Visual Communication; the Charisma elements are how the design is presented to the jury, how beautiful it is, how original and innovative it looks, the positive emotions resulting from exposure, the embedded creativity, and originality of the design. For a design to be charismatic, it must be: easy to understand, fun, responsible looking, visually stunning. While many design competitions indicate the aesthetics as a small factor, little weight in scoring, in fact the Charisma of the design, has almost 50% weight as usually we could see that it appears multiple times in the evaluation criteria in different forms. Design Charisma is about Form.Design Constitution includes criteria on materials, engineering, architecture, feasibility, durability, usefulness, industrialization potentials, commercial possibilities, consumer experience and other technical and technological innovation aspects such as critical thinking, cleverness, ergonomic factors etc. Design constitution relates to also finishing quality and craftsmanship of the designs, and its industrial aspects for ease of realization etc. For a design to have a good constitution, it must be: functional, realistic, and well-thought. Design Constitution is about Function. When we consider how the competitions are evaluated in the end, we could see that the design constitution elements provide around 50% of the score of a design in a competition.Design Wisdom includes information for relevance and context; for example if the design match the requirements of the original competition brief, if the design is responding to the social context, if it is ethical, if it is legal, if it appropriate, if it is easy to understand etc. For a design to have design wisdom, it must be: self-explanatory, relevant, and coherent. Design Wisdom is rarely shown as criteria; because it actually is not; it is more like a filter. If a design lacks the design wisdom, it gets eliminated from the competition. In any case, the following are the most common criteria (among the 500 stated) that the organizers communicate as judging criteria of a design competition: 1.Creativity, Originality, Innovation and Aesthetics (i.e. the CIAO criteria; the as in Italian Ciao!: the first impression), 2. Visual Communication, Presentation and Information Provided, 3. Feasibility, Engineering and Commercial Considerations, 4. Ergonomics, Social and Human Factors, 5. Relevancy to Brief. These criteria is defined by clustering all the 500+ responses in the designcompetition.com database together.Exerpt:How to judge entries in a competition: suggestions for evaluation criteria. To understand the most common evaluation criteria in ranking designs in a design competition, a survey was made with 1000+ participating design competitions. The data revealed the most common criteria questions and bullet points for design competitions.The importance and ranking of evaluation criteria for design was discovered based on the number of times they are written in the briefs of design competitions. After an an..

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